What Daisy Did: Story Behind the Brand

wdd1 What Daisy Did: Story Behind the Brand

I have just discovered another lovely ethical fashion brand, What Daisy Did that not only creates some pretty amazing bags but also has a great story to tell. the brand was founded by Daisy and Ozric who have spent a number years working at festivals and were shocked by the amount of waste left and the disposal lifestyles of those who left tents, wellies, clothes and camping equipment. The bags are designed to last and made from recycled leather that would otherwise be destined for landfill. Their bags are about slow fashion with timeless styles and a protest against synthetic and disposable fashion.

Daisy What Daisy Did: Story Behind the Brand

The bags are made by two brothers in India Pinu and Manish who also source the materials which come from waste scraps and end of rolls from surrounding factories. The leather for the Forest collection is tanned with sunlight and vegetable oil, it is sourced from small scale and commmunity farming in Bangladesh. This is a much healthier alternative both for the environment and those working in the industry.

60 families inclusing both men and women are involved in making the bags, Many were tailors that lost their jobs in the trade shift to China. All of the tailors work from home which is 60km from where the brothers live, they are paid a fair commission making it possible for them to make a living wage within normal working hours but the flexibility that they are offered also allows them to study at universiy or look after children. Three master tailors are also responsbible for creating the templates of the bags twoof which are  studing art at university.

Every last scrap of leather is used with any leftovers being sold onto a jewellery company.

Here are a few of my favourite pieces from the carnival collection.

 What Daisy Did: Story Behind the Brand

 What Daisy Did: Story Behind the Brand

 What Daisy Did: Story Behind the Brand

The colours are amazing and I can definitely see these bags looking great at a festival. But who doesn’t need a bit of colour in their  life all year round.

With warmest wishes

An Upcycled Fashion Show

DSCN4054 2 An Upcycled Fashion Show
Hat – Pachacuti
Jacket – upcycled from a vintage dressing gown
Fairtrade cotton vest top – Marks and Spencers
Necklace – Made
Jeggings – Oxfam
Shoes – Clarks
Bag – Reclaim Bags

On Saturday I took the girls over to Cribbs Causeway to check out the ‘Green is the New Black’ upcycled fashion show, an event organised by the St Vincent’s charity as part of Bristol Fashion Week. The fashion show featured some amazing upcycled fashion created by children from local Bristol schools. Of course I took the opportunity to wear an upcycled jacket that I created from a vintage kimono dressing gown with a bag by Reclaim mamde from recycled inner tubes. Unfortunately I had to leave my lovely Pachacuti hat behind in the car as the weather was atrocious and I was worried I might loose it in the wind.

DSCN4064 s An Upcycled Fashion Show

DSCN4062 s An Upcycled Fashion Show

 

DSCN4070 s An Upcycled Fashion ShowIt is great to see so much interest in recycled fashion by school children (hopefully the future of the fashion industry) and I was genuinely impressed by the creations which included a dress made from a deconstructed suit and other pieces made using newspaper, crisp wrappers, upcycles scarves and ties and bottle tops. I definitely think upcycled fashion is a great choice especially if you like to look individual and stand out from the crowd.

I have been meaning to do more upcycling, especially since starting my no new clothes for a year challenge. Unfortunately, I haven’t managed to do anything, strugging a bit for both ideas and time! This fashion show has definitely given me some great ideas, now I just need to make myself some time.

Do you have any good ideas or sources of inspiration for upcycled fashion? You can check out my ideas board on Pinterest here.

I hope you are having a fabulous start to the week and looking forward to the Easter break!

With warmest wishes

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Heart Prints – Thrifty Thursday Valentines Special

If you can’t wear a cute heart print outfit on Valentines Day then when can you wear one? But actually, I think heart prints are pretty classic and easy to wear making them a great find in a charity shop any time of the year. Here are just a few of the lovelies that I have spotted in the Oxfam online shop.

Not only is charity shopping really thrifty with many of these lovely pieces costing less than a tenner but shopping in Oxfam also helps to reduces clothes waste, has much less of an impact on our beautiful world than buying new and helps a very worthwhile charity at the same time, it is just about the ultimate in guilt free shopping! In case you are worried that your order won’t fit or suit you, they also have a 21 day return policy(except wedding dresses or overseas returns), which makes it pretty to easy to shop with them.
hearts 5 Heart Prints   Thrifty Thursday Valentines SpecialHeart Print Shorts by River Island – Size 12

hearts 7 Heart Prints   Thrifty Thursday Valentines Special
Vintage Heart Trousers by Richard Shops – Size 28″

hearts 4 Heart Prints   Thrifty Thursday Valentines SpecialRed and Gold Heart Blouse Size 12

heart 1 Heart Prints   Thrifty Thursday Valentines Special
Black and Red Top by M & S Size 8

heart 2 Heart Prints   Thrifty Thursday Valentines SpecialBlue knee Length Dress by Next – size 14

skater dress Heart Prints   Thrifty Thursday Valentines Special
Skater Dress by Tofu Size 8

If none of these pieces take your fancy, why not try updating something that you no longer wear with some DIY upcycling. I love this tutorial for a DIY ripped heart tshirt or this DIY heart on your sleeve projector check out this very cute heart chain stitch for embellishing just about anything.

Hearts, how will you be wearing yours for Valentines Day? on your sleeve perhaps? Whatever you do, have a lovely time.

With warmest wishes

No New Clothes for a Year

No New Clothes for a Year1 No New Clothes for a Year

I am perhaps a little late jumping on the band wagon but I have decided to take up the challenge, which has already been taken up by a number of other bloggers, for ‘no new clothes for a year’. I am hoping that it won’t be a particularly tough challenge as I have as many clothes as I need and I love vintage clothes and charity shopping. I am still going to write about ethical fashion brands for the blog but my outfits (and all the clothes that I wear in general) will be clothes that I already have plus the occasional ‘new’ vintage or second hand pieces. It will also be made much easier by the many places to go for tips including:

My Make Do and Mend Year

Vintage Vixen

Eco Warrior Princess – Buy Nothing New Challenge Its Easier Than You Think

Yummy Green Mummy – 2015 – Giving Up Buying New

Westy Writes – No New Clothes for 2014

If you know of any more no new clothes blogs or posts please let me know in the comments.

I will also be using the ‘No New Clothes for a Year’ challenge to introduce a greater focus on buying less and second hand clothes to this blog and hope to be posting more DIY / upcyced fashion posts to this blog as well as a weekly ‘thrifty Thursday’ feature. I hope to get the challenge off to a good start by having a massive clear out of my wardrobe and sorting out a pile of clothes to mend, alter and upcycle.

My ‘no new clothes for a year’ challenge will have a few little get outs though. I will if I need to buy new underwear and fitness clothes as these are not things that I would be happy buying second hand, but for these I will of course try and stick to my usual principles of buying from ethical and sustainable brands. And of course presents don’t count because it would be rude not to accept a pressy but I won’t active encourage anyone to buy me anything new as a present and if asked will suggest second hand or vintage choices.

So there I have done it! I have committed to no new clothes for a year. Are you doing any sustainable or  fashion challenges this year?

With warmest wishes

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#Secondhandfirst Week and an EFB Outfit Challenge

DSCN3441 2 #Secondhandfirst Week and an EFB Outfit Challenge

Coat- secondhand
Scarf – Oxfam (upcycled with pompom trim)
Jeggings – Oxfam
Top – SkunkFunk
Shoes – Clarks

Next week is #SecondhandFirst week, a event organised by the textile recycling charity TRAID to celebrate all things secondhand while committing to using more of our existing resources, rather than buying new. It will be marked by a week of events, workshops and initiatives between 17th – 23rd November in London.

But even if you don’t live in London, their are tonnes of ways that you can get involved, not least by wearing all or some secondhand clothes for the week and taking the #SecondhandFirst pledge to commit to buying a percentage of your clothes secondhand  and keeping clothes and other resources in circulation for longer by lending, swapping, mending and donating, visiting your local charity shop, running your own clothes swap.

Over at Ethical Fashion Bloggers we are also running a #secondhandfirst outfit challenge to create an outfit containing some or all secondhand clothes. You can see my outfit for the challenge above which features a pair of jeggings from Oxfam, my latest buy, a parka from Judy’s Affordable Vintage Fair and a silk scarf from Oxfam which has been upcycled with a pompom trim. The chair I am sitting on is also made from recycled saris.

I will also be trying to wear as many secondhand pieces next week and will hopefully share them via Twitter and Instagram. Quite a large proportion of my wardrobe already consists of secondhand clothes but from now on, I am commiting to try source more second hand instead of new (when I need to buy something).

Will you be wearing anything secondhand next week? Do you have any great tips for buying secondhand clothes?

With warmest wishes

Fix Up Look Sharp

Peach flannel and Denim crop F1.jpg 600x900 Fix Up Look SharpfulsReindeer F1 Fix Up Look Sharp
fulsPurple with purple green stripe F1 Fix Up Look Sharp

 

fulsBlack with Autumnal square F1 Fix Up Look Sharp

fulsSquare print F1 Fix Up Look SharpfulsDenim with grey flannel HH F1 Fix Up Look Sharp

fulsMFix up tshirt F1 Fix Up Look Sharp
I first discovered Fix Up Look Sharp at a fashion show at Bristol Big Green Week a few years back. Fix Up Look Sharp are all about raising money for an incredibly worthwhile charity Clic Sargent. CLIC, as I think it was previously called has helped my family during very difficult times and so is a charity very close to my heart. Charities like CLIC Sargent provide invaluable clinical, practical, financial and emotional support for children with cancer and their families helping them to deal with the shock of the diagnosis but also assisting them in getting the most out of life.You can read more about Charlotte, Fix Up Look Sharp Ambassador, her style and her journey here.

Fix Up Look Sharp have just launched a fab new website featuring their latest collection which takes charity shopping to the next level with fresh styles upcycled from vintage and second hand clothes. The clothes also offer great value with prices starting at £15 for a t shirt. They also have some great accessories including necklace, hairbands and beanie hats.

They had a launch a few weeks ago in Bristol and will be holding a launch party in London this Thursday.It looks fun and well worth a visit if you are nearby.

fuls Fix Up Look Sharp

I hope you are having a good week and not getting too wind swept by this dastardly weather!

With warmest wishes

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8 Online Fashion Shops Selling Amazing Preloved Clothes

onlinefashionshops1 8 Online Fashion Shops Selling Amazing Preloved Clothes

Who needs new clothes when there are so many amazing preloved clothes out there conveniently available from online shops. Preloved clothes rock because they are great value and you get that little bit more for your buck. Buying preloved clothes is also a great way to get an  instant wardrobe refresh without having a massive impact on the planet. We think preloved clothes are the ultimate sustainable fashion and perfect for those that just can’t do without their fahsion fix.

Here are our top 10 online fashion shops selling amazing preloved clothes

 

Motel Vintage

 8 Online Fashion Shops Selling Amazing Preloved Clothes

Motel Rocks is a popular online shop, but did you know that they have a vintage collection. Packed with a great selection of vintage band t shirts and reworked vintage pieces, Motel Vintage has some great styles that combine retro prints with contempory shapes.

Rock My Vintage

If you are looking for some lovely and really wearable vintage pieces that have been carefully handpicked, then you should definitely check out the genuine vintage section at Rock My Vintage. They have a great selection of vintage dresses as well as jewellery and bags that can be used to give a stylish twist to more modern clothes.

Urban Renewal

For hip street wear, Urban Outfitters Renewal collection has some great vintage and preloved pieces for men and women including checked shirts, beanie hats, baseball caps and wax jackets.

Vestiare Collective

If you want to live a champagne lifestyle on a lemonade budget then Vestiare Collective is a great place to shop. You can pick up preloved designer pieces at a fraction of the amount that they would cost new. This online fashion shop has a massive selection and you will find clothes by just about every designer that you could imagine, it is also carefully curated to ensure quality and authenticity.

Buy My Wardrobe

Buy My Wardrobe is yet another amazing website where you can buy and sell designer clothing. Their mission to create a “trusted social shopping site with real people behind real profiles. A place to browse and be inspired as well as buy and sell pre-owned designer fashion.”

Oxfam Fashion

The online Oxfam Fashion shop now has a massive selection of preloved and vintage pieces at great prices. It features the top picks from Oxfam shops around the country. The site makes finding exactly what you want easy peasy with filters for brand, size, style etc. The prices are also pretty amazing with brands including Whistles, Ted Baker and Hobbs.

ASOS Reclaimed Vintage

The ASOS reclaimed collection contains some fabulous pieces created from vintage pieces and deadstock fashioned into unique and individual trend lead pieces.

ASOS Marketplace

ASOS Marketplace is another great place to buy preloved clothes straight from the sellers wardrobe as well as vintage and indie labels from a variety of boutique shops. Not all of the clothes are preloved so try filtering your search for preloved or vintage to save precious time if that is what you are looking for.

Do you know of any other shops selling amazing pre loved clothes?

Please tweet me @styleeyes to share

With warmest wishes

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Recycled Jewellery at OrnateMe

0061 Recycled Jewellery at OrnateMe
018 Recycled Jewellery at OrnateMe
I love jewellery and can’t help but constantly refresh my collection to allow me to refresh and accessorise my outfits in lots of different ways. I try to buy upcycled, fair trade and sustainable jewellery, but it has always bothered me that buying too much costume or fashion jewellery is wasteful. It seems a real shame that such a lot of the lovely costume jewellery bought in the shops will probably end up in landfill. This is where OrnateMe a fab new website concieved by Paul Tully in response to his concern about the unsustainability of the current fashion industry and the throw away attitude driven by low cost products. He hopes that through the success of his business, he will help high street retailers to adopt more sustainable retailing models.

The idea behind OrnateMe is simple. It provides an easy way for customers to upcycle their old costume jewellery. You just need to put your old jewellery into a prepaid envelope and send it in. For each piece of jewellery that is resaleable, you recieve points which can be used towards a piece of jewellery that you would like to buy on the site. Pieces that are not resellable are upcycled.

The website also has a great selection of recycled jewellery to buy and of course I couldn’t help but have a little browse. I have been on the look out for friendship and boho bracelets to wear with casual clothes for the summer and when I spotted these two picture above, I couldn’t resist getting them. They arrived in an envelope which I can then reuse to send back any of my unwanted jewellery. I just need to make a little time to have a clear out of my jewellery collection and decide what I no longer wear.

What do you think of this idea? Do you have any jewellery to recycle and do you love the idea of getting credits to buy a piece of recycled jewellery?

With warmest wishes

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Story Behind the Brand – The Feather Tree

I have just discovered the most amazing brand whilst following the Ethical Fashion Forum Brand Preview on Twitter. Before I share the lovely story behind the brand, I just wanted to share with you some of the amazing pieces featured on their website many of which are most definitely making their way onto my wishlist!

Maasai 1 Story Behind the Brand   The Feather Tree

the feather tree 4 Story Behind the Brand   The Feather Tree

Dress Story Behind the Brand   The Feather Tree

The Feather Tree 3 Story Behind the Brand   The Feather Tree

The Feather Tree 1 Story Behind the Brand   The Feather TreeThe Feather Tree 2 Story Behind the Brand   The Feather Tree

The Feather Tree was set up by Lissa and Bo inspired by their magical world filled with feathers, outrageously quirky prints, quills and skills. The brand is all about hair feathers, colourful handmade jewellery and unique clothing that combines UK trends with a contemporary Kenyan edge. Lissa and Bo saw the beautiful potential in  recycled fabrics brought from Matumba (a Kenyan Market) and traditional Masai beadwork both to create really amazing clothes and jewellery and also a seed of opportunity for people in Kenya on very low incomes. Paid per piece of clothing or jewellery, everyone involved in the manufacture benefits from every single piece sold, allowing them to supplement their incomes and build a better life. Hair feather and feathers used in The Feather Tree jewellery are ethically sourced and then dyed by Lissa and Bo.


Beadwork Story Behind the Brand   The Feather Tree

The beaded jewellery at The Feather Tree is made by Dayvid. Lissa’s family met Dayvid and when they asked about the colourful beaded belt that he was wearing, they discovered that he had made it himself. The Feather Tree was a great way to promote the amazing talents and craftmanship of Dayvid and others in Kenya allowing them to get their products to marketplace and the chance for us in the UK to buy these beautiful and unusual pieces.

Our tailor Odayo Story Behind the Brand   The Feather Tree

Odayo is the talented tailor at Feather Tree. He was born and raised in Kisumu on the shores of lake Victoria. He has completed a 4 year course in tailoring but only got the chance to use his talents in a full time role when he was discovered by Lissa’s mum working as a gardener. The money that he has earnt has helped him to build a small house for his family and he hope to be able to continue and pay for his children’s education.

The Matuba Market started in the nineties selling good quality clothing at affordable prices that had not been sold in high streets in Europe. The market is now a thriving industry creating 1000’s of jobs in Kenya and a source of interesting fabrics used in clothes made by the Feather Tree. Locally Kenya sourced Kitenge fabrics are also used to create clothing. Instead of using plastic buttons, The Feather Tree uses coconut buttons and painted beads which are handmade in Kenya in their clothes and jewellery.

You can find out more about The Feather Tree and check out their fantastic designs and hair feathers here:

www.thefeathertree.co.uk

https://www.facebook.com/TheFeatherTree

https://twitter.com/thefeathertree

Have you discovered any amazing brands with a great story to tell lately? If so please share!

With warmest wishes

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Here Today, Here Tommorrow – Made in Nepal Collection

TopPattern model03 web Here Today, Here Tommorrow   Made in Nepal Collection

 

Fair trade headband Here Today, Here Tommorrow   Made in Nepal CollectionHatBobble Navy model web large Here Today, Here Tommorrow   Made in Nepal Collectionfair trade small hairbow Here Today, Here Tommorrow   Made in Nepal CollectionToday I wanted to share Here Today, Here Tommorrow, a brand whose name sums up just what I think clothes and fashion should be about. This for me is not just about building a sustainable wardrobe (one that will stand the test of time in terms of both style and quality) but also about sustainability for the environment and the livelihoods of those involved in the supply chain. I want it all to be be ‘here today and here tommorrow!’

In keeping with the principles of slow fashion and sustainability, Here Today, Here Tommorrow not only sell their own range of  Fairtrade clothing but also run a variety of workshops including knitting,sewing and natural dying. Here Today, Gone Tommorrow is a collaborative studio shop, where they design, make, mend, showcase, sell and educate, all under the same roof, accessible and visible to all. If you can’t get over to Dalston in North London for a visit, you can also check out the online shop here.

fair trade apron Here Today, Here Tommorrow   Made in Nepal Collection

They have some great fairtrade, handwoven aprons and oven gloves which would definitely bring out the domestic goddess in me (if there is one!).

dress02web2 Here Today, Here Tommorrow   Made in Nepal Collection

They also stock some great pieces by Antiform. Made in Britain from reclaimed fabric.

The brand was set up by four ladies Anna Marie Hesse, Emma Dulcie Rigby, Katelyn Toth-Fejel, Julia Crew and Ines Vicente, each with their own unique experience in a variety of sustainable fashion ventures. They have a holistic approach to sustainability and believe that there is no such thing as one size fits all.

As designers they are concerned by the disposable and throw away nature of fashion, and within society as a whole. They try to address the environmental and social impacts of thoughtless production and consumption. They strive to make high quality, beautiful products that address a range of sustainable and ethical practices, including handmade craftsmanship, locality, durability, recycling, natural dye, organic materials, fair trade, individuality and transparency of production.

Check out this video for more information on the Here Today, Gone Tommorrow, Made in Nepal Colllection.

With warmest wishes


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